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da vinci code

This is a discussion on da vinci code within the General Chat forums, part of the Map Forums category; Hey there for the second question: according to kryptos, what are the initials of the person who "knows the exact ...

  1. #1
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    da vinci code

    Hey there
    for the second question: according to kryptos, what are the initials of the person who "knows the exact location?"... what's the answer?

  2. #2
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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  3. #3
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    Re: da vinci code

    Quote Originally Posted by Elisa
    Hey there
    for the second question: according to kryptos, what are the initials of the person who "knows the exact location?"... what's the answer?

  4. #4
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    a feminist perspective on the da vinci code

    Quickly becoming one of the best-selling books of all time, Dan Brown’s The Da Vinci Code reintroduces the sacred feminine into modern society. Brimming with controversy, the novel weaves fact and fiction into a high-paced thriller that reinvents the patriarchy’s propagated history of Christianity. The basic premise of the novel is that when the pagan Roman Emperor Constantine the Great and his Council of Nicaea were choosing which texts would make it into the Biblical Cannon, they purposely erased traces of the sacred feminine for political reasons—particularly Mary Magdalene’s role as Christ’s wife and favorite apostle. By depicting the fictional quest of protagonists Robert Langdon and Sophie Neveu, Brown exposes the theories and evidence supporting that Christ intended women to play a more equal role in the early Christian church. Furthermore, Brown’s revisionist mythmaking brings light to the popular consciousness the probability that because the Bible was written by man, the subjugation of women by the patriarchy was not condoned by their greatest weapon: God. By continually highlighting both the gender equality of ancient polytheistic religions and Constantine’s revising of the sacred feminine, Brown prepares the reader to consider his controversial claim that Mary Magdalene was the wife of Jesus Christ.
    By focusing on early pagan goddess worship and its appropriation into Christianity, Brown emphasizes the existence of the sacred feminine before the creation of theological myths that victimize women as the foundation of evil in the world. Cleverly, Brown introduces his thesis about the sacred feminine through the mouth of Robert Langdon: “Essentially, the manuscript is about the iconography of goddess worship—the concept of female sanctity and the art and symbols associated with it” (23). This, of course, is the underlying theme of Brown’s novel as well.
    Early in the development of the novel, Brown works to revise the myths associated with paganism and propagate the sacred feminine. First he has Langdon explain the myth associated with the pentacle drawn on Jacques Sauniére’s chest. Langdon explains that the word pagan is not “synonymous with devil worship” (36). He goes on to explicate the pentacle symbol as the important “balance of power” between the male and female deities. By emphasizing this point, Brown is highlighting the closer gender equality that probably existed before the popularity of modern monotheistic religions. Langdon goes on to explain the Vatican’s “smear campaign against the pagan gods and goddesses, recasting their divine symbols as evil,” first introducing The Church as a politically motivated and misogynistic antagonist (37). Brown is also introducing the Christian myths that he will attempt to revise.
    In a further attempt to glorify the sacred feminine, Brown connects the protagonists to the Priory of Sion and sets it up as the only positive institution in the story. Because it is “the pagan goddess worship cult” and included many revered historical members, the Priory is a good device for Brown’s purpose of stressing the validity of the sacred feminine (113). Furthermore, the Priory’s most famous grand master was Leonardo Da Vinci. To further emphasize the legitimacy of the sacred feminine, Brown focuses on the feminist symbols in some of Leonardo’s most famous work. For example, Langdon explains the pagan goddess symbols included in the Mona Lisa: “Because Da Vinci was a big fan of feminine principles, he made Mona Lisa look more majestic from the left than the right” (119). The left is traditionally associated with the female so by making the androgynous Mona Lisa larger on the left, Leonardo is paying homage to the sacred feminine. Moreover, Langdon illuminates a theory behind the Mona Lisa’s famous smile. Following the theme of pagan gender equality, the Mona Lisa is a symbol of the androgynous fusing of Egyptian male and female deities. When the names of the Egyptian god of fertility, Amon, and the Egyptian goddess of fertility, Isis or L’ISA, are fused together it spells: “AMON L’ISA… an anagram of the divine union of male and female” (121). Brown’s use of the Mona Lisa is of key importance because it is a communally recognized symbol that he has revised to stand for the sacred feminine. The reader will most likely forever associate the sacred feminine with the Mona Lisa, a step toward countering the misogynistic symbols permeating modern Christian society.
    Brown also uses the sacred feminine to counter the Eve myth. By incorporating a sexual ceremony into the mystical rituals of the Priory of Sion, Brown sets up a forum to discuss the ancient belief that the female is sacred and “a god” because of her ability to produce life (309). The sexual ceremony described by Sopie is called Hieros Gamos, an ancient Egyptian practice “to celebrate the reproductive power of the female” (30. Furthermore, Langdon proposes that early Jewish traditions shockingly included “ritualistic sex. In the Temple, no less” (309). He goes on to explain that “YHWH” or the Jewish tetragrammaton for God actually derived from “Jehovah” or the “androgynous physical union between the masculine Jah and the pre-Hebraic name for Eve, Havah” (309), therefore revising Eve’s traditional role as the devil’s “favorite accomplice” (125). By including this glorification of the sexual union and reverence for the sacred feminine, Brown is also countering the Christian stereotype “to demonize sex and recast it as a disgusting and sinful act” (309).
    Brown’s next step in his goal of revisionist mythmaking of the sacred feminine is to discredit the ultimate authority and primary basis of modern misogyny—the Bible. Brown’s attempt to demonstrate that the “Bible did not arrive by fax from heaven” (231), but is man-made with room for error undermines the Church’s attempt to use the Bible as ammunition for the subjugation of women. For example, Leigh Teabing describes the canonization of the Bible as “The fundamental irony of Christianity! The Bible, as we know it today, was collated by the pagan Roman Emperor Constantine the Great” (231). Teabing goes on to propose that “Constantine turned Jesus into a deity… whose power was unchallengeable” for the Church’s political reasons (233). Because the only “established sacred channel” was “the Roman Catholic Church,” the Vatican gained “unchallengeable” religious and political power (233). To accomplish the radical goal of reforming an already established religion for political reasons, Teabing points out that “Constantine commissioned and financed a new Bible, which omitted those gospels that spoke of Christ’s human traits and embellished those gospels that made Him godlike. The earlier gospels were outlawed, gathered up, and burned” (234). By suggesting that the Bible is a compilation of half-truths and “misinformation” (234), Dan Brown, at the least, places doubt into the reader’s mind about the reliability of the Bible and, ultimately, the authority behind the subjugation forced upon women for centuries. He then uses his conspiracy theory to propose that because “it posed a threat to the rise of the predominantly male Church…, the sacred feminine was demonized and called unclean” (23. Brown also proposes an alternative authority to back his claims. Although the Church virtually wiped-out all evidence that contradicts the Biblical Cannon, alternative Gnostic texts managed to survive in The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Coptic Scrolls at Nag Hammadi (234).
    After establishing in the reader’s mind that women were not always viewed as man’s lesser half by establishing the ancient pagan ideal of the sacred feminine as proof, then discrediting the accuracy of the Bible by portraying it is a political conspiracy to erase the human aspects of Christ, Dan Brown proposes the most shocking theory of the novel, Mary Magdalene’s “marriage to Jesus Christ” (244). He begins by proposing through Teabing that Mary Magdalene has been represented symbolically as the Holy Grail or the chalice. Therefore “chivalric quests for the Lost Grail” is code to “protect themselves from a Church that had subjugated women, banished the Goddess, burned nonbelievers, and forbidden the pagan reverence for the sacred feminine” (238-39).
    Brown first supports his thesis that Mary Magdalene is, in fact, the Holy Grail through the symbols in the art of Leonardo Da Vinci. He points out that in Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper, the disciple seated next to Christ, mirroring him as “yin and yang” is actually Mary Magdalene (244). Although this is a very controversial claim, the reader is more likely to adopt it because the previous investigation of church conspiracy is combined with the willing suspension of disbelief achieved by mixing fact and fiction. Brown also emphasizes the fact that Mary Magdalene was not a prostitute. Her negative portrayal was a “smear campaign lunched by the early Church. The Church needed to defame Mary Magdalene in order to cover up her dangerous secret” (244). Here Brown is not only revising the myth surrounding Mary Magdalene, he is also emphasizing a lie actually repealed by the Catholic Church in 1969 (Cannon xvi). Brown later proposes that “Magdalene was recast as a whore in order to erase evidence of her powerful family ties” (249), discrediting the possibility of her supposed offspring with Jesus may have to the Holy Roman throne. The claim that Christ and Mary Magdalene had children is not well supported with historical fact; nonetheless, it allows Brown the venue to further propagate Mary Magdalene’s position as the Christian embodiment of the sacred feminine.
    Brown, through Teabing, also points out that because “Jesus was a Jew… the social decorum during that time virtually forbid a Jewish man to be unmarried” (245). Furthermore, he adds: “If Jesus were not married, at least one of the Bible’s gospels would have mentioned it and offered some explanation for His unnatural state of bachelorhood” (245).
    The most concrete evidence in The Da Vinci Code supporting the claim that Christ and Mary Magdalene were married comes for the Gnostic texts, introduced earlier. Teabing points out that The Gospel of Philip possibly claims that Mary Magdalene and Jesus were married: “And the companion of the Savior is Mary Magdalene. Christ loved her more that all the disciples and used to kiss her often on her mouth. The rest of the disciples were offended by it and expressed disapproval. They said to him, “Why do you love her more that all of us?” (246). The evidence here is particularly damning to the Church because, as Teabing explains, “companion, in those days, literally meant spouse” (246). Furthermore, Teabing points out that Levi says in The Gospel of Mary Magdalene, “…he loved her more than us” (247).
    As Brown explains, evidence that Mary Magdalene was the wife and confidant of Christ is particularly important because she was supposedly giving instructions by Christ on how to carry on the church making her, not Peter, the foundation of the papacy. Teabing explains: “Jesus was the original feminist. He intended for the future of His Church to be in the hands of Mary Magdalene” (24. Whether the theory of Mary Magdalene as the original founder of the church is fact or fiction is difficult to prove, but because Dan Brown propagates her as such, the myth of Mary Magdalene has been revised in the consciousness of the readers, an important step towards revising the position of women in modern society. Teabing bluntly sums up Brown’s thesis that “the greatest story ever told is, in fact, the greatest story ever sold” (267).
    Although his story is a mix of fact and fiction, it is important to remember that so are important works such as Paradise Lost that use the Bible to subjugate women to the constrictions of the patriarchy. By creating a best selling novel that revises patriarchal myths, Dan Brown is working to counter hundreds of years of misogynistic propaganda. If it accomplishes nothing else, The Da Vinci Code is important because it inspires debate that makes the public look beyond the face value of their religion and hopefully inspiring a new generation of feminists!

    Brown, Dan. “Da Vinci Code.” New York: Doubleday, 2003.

    Cannon, Laura-Lea and David Tresemer. Preface. The Gospel of Mary Magdalene. Trans. Jean-Yves Leloup. Rochester: Inner Traditions, 2002. ix-xxii.

  5. #5
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    da vinci codizzle

    foreezy

  6. #6
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    Kate, while you may know a lot about the da vinci code, you failed to answer the freakin question. Not to mention the fact that you gave a way tons of secrets of the book. Im just glad I have read it because you have totally spoiled the puzzles of the book (no offense intended).

    on a similar note, i hope you realize that this book is a combination of fiction and theory. Fiction meaning it is not factual in any way, and theory which is basically fiction until it is proven (and can only be proven after numerous "experiments").

    I am not saying that the theory laid out in the book is completely false. Actually, I happen to lean more towards the theoretical. It is very plausible. I am not saying you are wrong in your beliefs. I just needed to convey that.

    I am saying that you should not write if you a) cannot answer the info (which you may have. your answer was entirely too long to for this ADHD child to care to read), and (most importantly) b) dont spoil the story without warning in the beginning of your reply


    thank you

  7. #7
    Anonymous is offline Senior Member Black Belt
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    why ww?

    why does ww know the location and who is he?

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